You Might Be a Writer If…

Warning: Do not have liquids in your mouth as you read this entry. Hilarious!

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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A lot of “stuff” has been going on in my life lately. Hard stuff. Heavy stuff. The kind of stuff that just makes me want to write massacre scenes….except I am so brain dead I had to google how to spell “massacre.”

Masicker? Missucker?

WHAT AM I DOING???? *breaks down sobbing*

I am supposed to be an adult an expert okay, maybe functionally literate. Fine, I give up! I have nothing left to saaaaayyyyyy. I am all out of woooords *builds pillow fort*.

I figured it’s time for a bit of levity. Heck, I need a good laugh. How about you guys?

We writers are different *eye twitches* for sure, but the world would be SO boring without us. Am I the only person who watches Discovery ID and critiques the killers?

You are putting the body THERE? Do you just WANT to go to prison? Why did you STAB…

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Journalism, in fewer than 400 words

About reporting

How nice of the New York Times’ public editor, Margaret Sullivan, to hand all of us this near the end of the semester: “Everything I Know About Journalism in 395 Words.”

No way I would be able to put this as succinctly as she does, but I agree with her advice — a gift to her last journalism class (for the foreseeable future) at Columbia University.

Here it is:

1. About social media.
• No road rage; walk away from the keyboard.
• Be useful.
• Be responsive.
• Be willing to correct and acknowledge errors immediately.
• Show restraint; remember that you are posting to The World. Forever.
• Try for a mix of 20 percent fun and 80 percent hard information.
• Read every link before re-tweeting or re-posting.
• It’s a tool, not an end in itself.

2. About journalism.
• Don’t cut corners. Do the actual…

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Unfinished Business (Blogposts)

nervous

Just wondering, how many of you have unfinished blog posts out there? I start it with gusto then when it’s time to hit the post button, I can’t do it. Me? I’m currently on number eight. They’re sitting unfinished and some even now irrelevant in content. Yet I don’t have the heart to delete it forever. For example: I started a post called “Why I never Believed in Santa Clause”; in January that seems a bit… I don’t know.. not interesting? Would anyone even be interested in reading something like that in January or any other time of the year besides Christmas? Feel free to comment below either way. You won’t hurt my feelings.

The content about my story; I haven’t had the nerve yet to do a WIP even though all the other WIPers are very open and smart and thoughtful. Anxiety much? Yeah that’s me. This post almost became archived, unfinished number nine. Anyone with any advice at all on how they overcame or are coping with the anxiety surrounding sharing their writing, it would be greatly appreciated. Please share, liberally. Thanks in advance.

We need Kwanzaa more than ever this year | Michael W Twitty | Comment is free | The Guardian

Beautiful.

Afroculinaria

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/dec/26/black-lives-kwanzaa-2014

My contribution to the Guardian in honor of Kwanzaa, in which we are in the midst, the seven day harvest festival, a time to recommit to action and reflection to values that work together for the good of the community.

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THE AFRO-CULINARY NGUZO SABA

Nguzo Saba (the Seven Principles): 
Umoja (Unity)
Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)
Ujima(Collective Work&Responsibility)
Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics)
Nia(Purpose)
Kuumba (Creativity)
Imani(Faith).

1. Unity: Where the boat picked us up is more important than where it dropped us off. We celebrate our culinary heritage as African people all around the globe. We support each other and celebrate our foodways from sea to sea, land to land.

2. Self-Determination: We have an obligation to organize, construct and maintain our own food systems. Culinary justice and food sovereignty are all about self-determination. We determine and protect our culinary narrative and it’s integrity.

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3. Collective work and responsibility: No one person can cook, write our food history…

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